Professor Weissmark with her students at Harvard

PSYCHOLOGY OF DIVERSITY | Psychology PSYC S-1507
[Harvard University 2014]
Lectures: Tuesday & Thursday 12:00-3:00
Place: Sever Hall
Professor: Mona Sue Weissmark
E-mail: weissmar@fas.harvard.edu
 

Professor Weissmark with her students at Harvard

harvard

PSYCHOLOGY OF DIVERSITY | Psychology PSYC S-1507
[Harvard University 2013]
Lectures: Tuesday & Thursday 12:00-3:00
Place: Sever Hall
Professor: Mona Sue Weissmark
E-mail: weissmar@fas.harvard.edu

Professor Weissmark with her students at Harvard

harvard

PSYCHOLOGY OF DIVERSITY | Psychology PSYC S-1507
[Harvard University 2011]
Lectures: Tuesday & Thursday 12:00-3:00
Place: Sever Hall
Professor: Mona Sue Weissmark
E-mail: weissmar@fas.harvard.edu

Course Description: The United States is increasingly diverse and the world increasingly globalized. The central focus of the course is on the links between diversity and psychological processes at individual, interpersonal, and international levels. We consider several basic questions: What is diversity? How do race, nationality, and religion influence individuals? What impact does diversity have on cross-group relationships? How is diversity related to people's perceptions of fairness and justice? What is the relevance of people's perceptions of fairness and justice to social problems and social change? Does respect for diversity promote peace and positive change? Much research has addressed these questions, and we closely examine the evidence that has emerged so far. Prerequisite: an introductory course in psychology.

Professor Weissmark with her students at Harvard
PSYCHOLOGY OF DIVERSITY | Psychology PSYC S-1507
[Harvard University 2009]
Lectures: Tuesday & Thursday 12:00-3:00
Place: Sever Hall
Professor: Mona Sue Weissmark
E-mail: weissmar@fas.harvard.edu

Course Description: The United States is increasingly diverse and the world increasingly globalized. The central focus of the course is on the links between diversity and psychological processes at individual, interpersonal, and international levels. We consider several basic questions: What is diversity? How do race, nationality, and religion influence individuals? What impact does diversity have on cross-group relationships? How is diversity related to people's perceptions of fairness and justice? What is the relevance of people's perceptions of fairness and justice to social problems and social change? Does respect for diversity promote peace and positive change? Much research has addressed these questions, and we closely examine the evidence that has emerged so far. Prerequisite: an introductory course in psychology.

PSYCHOLOGY OF DIVERSITY | Psychology 314 Special Topics
[Northwestern University 2005-present]
Undergraduate course
Fall quarter
Winter quarter
Spring Quarter
Lectures: Tuesday & Thursday 12:30-1:50
Place: Swift Hall 107
Professor: Mona Sue Weissmark
E-mail: weissmar@northwestern.edu
Office Hours: Tuesday & Thursday 2:00-3:00, and by appointment

Course Description: The United States is becoming increasingly diverse and the world increasingly globalized. The central focus of the course will be on the links between diversity and psychological processes at individual, interpersonal, international, and institutional levels. We will consider several basic questions, including: What is diversity? How do race, nationality, and religion influence individuals? What impact does diversity have on cross-group relationships? How is diversity related to people's perceptions of fairness and justice? What is the relevance of people's perceptions of fairness and justice to social problems and social change? Does respect for diversity promote peace and positive change? Much research has addressed these questions, and we will closely examine the evidence that has emerged so far. Prerequisites: 110 plus either 204 or 215Teaching Method: Lecture, Discussion, and Web site.Readings: Textbook chapters and journal articles. Most of the readings (see detailed class schedule) are available through the Blackboard site for the course or are on reserve at the library.

MARITAL AND FAMILY PSYCHOTHERAPY| Psychology 655[Roosevelt University 1994-2003] Graduate course Fall semester Spring semester Lectures: Tuesdays 12:45-1:30 Place: DT and AARC Professor: Mona Sue Weissmark Office Hours: Thursdays 11:30-12; 30 Course Description: This course provides an opportunity for students to become familiar with and differentiate between the major conceptual models outlined by contemporary theorists and practitioners of marital and family therapy. Students in this course will be provided opportunities to: (1) Gain knowledge of the historical development of marital and family approaches to therapy and how they differ from individual approaches. (2) Gain knowledge of major theoretical models of marital and family therapy. (3) Become familiar with the interventions that these models use when working with Couples and families. (4) Develop competence in assessing the level of functioning and problem areas for couples and families and designing appropriate empirically based effective therapeutic interventions.  (5) Gain knowledge of professional organizations, training standards, credentialing bodies, and ethical codes pertaining to the practice of family and marital therapy.

THEORIES OF PERSONALITY| Psychology 342[Roosevelt University 1994-2003] Undergraduate course Fall semester Lectures: Tuesdays & Thursdays 11:30-12:45 Place: DT and AARC Professor: Mona Sue Weissmark Office Hours: Thursdays 9:00-10; 30 Course Description: This course is an introduction to theory and research in personality psychology. Topics include the dynamics, structure, and assessment of personality as well as personality development and change. We will also consider biological and socio-cultural influences on personality and discuss complex personality processes such as aggression, sex-typing, and health-related behaviors.

ADVANCED RESEARCH METHODS: Psychology 530 RESEARCH METHODS: Psychology 285[Roosevelt University 1994-2003] Graduate and undergraduate course Fall semester Lectures: Mondays & Wednesdays 11:30-12:45 Professor: Mona Sue Weissmark Office Hours: Monday 9:30-10:30  Course Description: To provide an introduction to the conducting and evaluating of research in psychology, and to provide the information and skills necessary to design a research proposal. Students are required to complete a research proposal in the form of a final paper. We will approach the final paper in steps--steps that will help you plan an interesting and feasible project. For this reason, topics covered in the readings and lectures are ordered chronologically to correspond roughly to the sequence of stages in planning, carrying out, and writing the final research proposal. Sequence of Topics The following topics will be covered in the course in the listed sequence. (1) The scientific approach: The assumptions that go into the development of scientific investigations. (2) Questions and Hypotheses:  How research questions are developed from causal observation, formal theoretical deductions, and previous research. (3) Measurement: Operational definitions, measurement theory, types of reliability, and concepts of validity. (4) The simple group comparison design: Experimental and control groups. The logic of causality. The variability problem. Null hypothesis. Independent and dependent variables. Type 1 and Type 11 errors. (5) Expanding the simple experiment: The multiple group experiment, the factorial design. (6) Within -Subjects Designs: Matched pairs, within-subjects, counterbalanced.           (7) Selecting Variables. What predictors do you want to study? What are your outcomes? Independent, dependent, and control variables. (8)  Reading and evaluating research. Abstract, introduction, method, results, discussion. (9) Single-n experiments and quasi-experiments. Inferring causality, accounting for nontreatment factors. (10) Descriptive methods. Descriptive research and causality. Description for description’s sake. Description for prediction’s sake. Making inferences from data.  (11) Survey research.  Questionnaires, psychological tests, interview. Administering the survey. Analyzing the survey. (12) Writing research proposals. (13) Ethics and professional conduct in research. The American Psychological Association’s Principles Covering the Treatment of Human Participants.         

MARITAL THERAPY|HDRF-354 [University of Connecticut 1993] Graduate Spring semester Lectures: Mondays & Wednesdays 11:30-12:45 Professor:   Mona Sue Weissmark Office Hours: Monday 9:30-10:30  Course Description: An overview of the field of marital therapy, focusing on theory, clinical practice, and research.  The purposes of this course are: a) to review the basic conceptual premises and intervention strategies of the major schools of marital therapy; b) to provide information on research methodological issues; c) to critically evaluate the empirical research on effective marital therapy treatments; d) to get familiar with the code of ethics for marriage and family therapists developed by AAMFT.

INTRODUCTION TO GRADUATE STUDY IN SOCIAL SCIENCES | SSCIE-100 [Harvard University 1991-1994] Graduate course Fall semester Spring semester Lectures: Wednesdays 5:30-7:30 Place: William James Hall Professor: Mona Sue WeissmarkOffice Hours: Wednesdays 3:30-4:30Course Description: The purposes of this course are: a) to provide the information and skills necessary to design a research investigation in the behavioral and social sciences; b) to provide the knowledge base upon which the student will be equipped to understand, appreciate, and analyze published research reports. This course does not cover issues relating to descriptive or historical research methods.